'Time traveler': Conspiracy fans discover a man holding something resembling a smartphone in an 85-year-old painting

‘Time traveler’: Conspiracy fans discover a man holding something resembling a smartphone in an 85-year-old painting

Some conspiracy fans have found something strange in a 1930s mural of a scene from 17th century colonial America, and they believe it is evidence of time travel. Umberto Romano’s 1937 painting, Mr. Pynchon And The Settling Of Springfield, shows English colonizer and fur trader William Pynchon. Best known for founding the town of Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1636, the Pynchon was photographed trading with the Native Americans living in the area at the time.

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If one looks at the board carefully, one will notice that one of the men is looking at a rectangular object in his right hand. Surprisingly, the object resembles a smartphone. The man in the painting holds the thing the way people in the 21st century hold a smartphone and scroll down with their thumbs. The mural is one of six paintings in the Main Post Office in Springfield, and has not been altered since 1937, when it was originally painted. The artist Romano died in 1982.

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Some believe that this mural is evidence that time travelers have put modern technology back into the past. However, there are others who say the thing may also be a mirror, which was very common in 17th century New England.

If one looks at the board carefully, one will notice that one of the men is looking at a rectangular object resembling a smartphone in his right hand (USPS)

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One Twitter user wrote of the photo: “Mirror. But a great example of how our minds project in the sense that it doesn’t exist.” “The problem is that this painting is from the early 1800s and a personal mirror was very rare and few Native Americans owned one for many reasons. Most of the shape is not oval or round the most common type and finally its thumb position,” another wrote.

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“Is this an iPhone?” One user wondered, while another said, “Obviously he’s a time traveler.” One user wrote, “Since it’s sitting in the pills, could it be an accounting board?”


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Another painting from the 1860s that recently baffled viewers shows a woman holding what appears to be an iPhone. The painting shows the woman looking at the object and holding it with both hands as she walks down a country road The Expected One, by Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller.

Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller's painting attracted
Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller’s 1860 painting “The Expected One” attracted interest to show a woman supposedly holding an iPhone (Hajotthu/Wikimedia Commons)

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However, experts believe that there is a more credible explanation. Peter Russell, whose remark sparked the plot, said, “What amazes me most is how much change in technology has altered the interpretation of the painting, and in some way benefited from its entire context.” vice. “The big change is that in the 1850s or 1860s, every viewer could identify the element a girl assimilates as a hymn book or a prayer book. Today, no one can fail to see the resemblance to the scene of a teenage girl absorbing in social media on their smart phones.

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There were other times when the technology was supposedly seen in ancient paintings. Tim Cook, the head of Apple, claimed to have noticed an iPhone in a 350-year-old painting when he visited a museum in Amsterdam. The painting showed a man holding a rectangular object resembling an iPhone while a woman, a child and a dog seemed interested in the object. “I always thought I knew when the iPhone was invented, but now I’m not sure anymore,” Cook said at the time. The first iPhone was launched only in 2007.

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